Category: NCSA Recruiting

NCSA: How social media recruiting is changing

USA TODAY High School Sports has a weekly column on the college recruiting process. Here, you’ll find practical tips and real-world advice on becoming a better recruit to maximize your opportunities and play at the college level. Jason Smith is a former NCAA DIII athlete and college coach at all three division levels. Jason is just one of many former college and professional athletes, college coaches and parents who are part of the Next College Student Athlete team. Their knowledge, experience and dedication, along with NCSA’s history of digital innovation and long-standing relationship with the college coaching community, have made NCSA the largest and most successful athletic recruiting network in the country.

College recruiting is constantly changing for student-athletes. Whether it’s new NCAA regulations or technological developments, the recruiting process is constantly being tweaked throughout the years. College coaches and recruits had to overhaul their approach when social media became an integral part of recruiting, with communication becoming much more public. There’s a lot to learn when it comes to how to use social media for recruiting and there will undoubtedly be more developments in the future, but here is a rundown of some of the issues recruits currently have to consider.
Rules are becoming more lenient
At the 2019 NCAA Rules Convention held in Orlando, several new proposals were passed, including one that deregulates recruiting communication for Division III schools. Adopted by a vote of 391-82, this new rule allows Division III coaches to publicly react to content posted by prospective student-athletes, including likes, favorites, shares and retweets. Coaches are now also allowed to friend and follow recruits. The rule change aligns Division III rules with those at the Division II and Division I levels.
Additionally, some universities now have less power in regulating the social media use of their athletes. In 2016, the National Labor Relations Board decided that some private schools shouldn’t be able to control players’ social media. However, that doesn’t mean athletes can’t get in trouble for anything they do on social media. They just have to do more self-regulation.
Coaches are becoming increasingly likely to search athlete profiles
According to college coaches surveyed by Cornerstone Reputation, 85 percent search athlete profiles on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and other social media platforms. From a coach’s perspective, this makes a lot of sense. When they are looking for a recruit, they are looking for someone that their college will invest a lot of money into — sometimes hundreds of thousands of dollars in scholarship money, training and equipment. Coaches want to make the best decision they can, as it can impact their careers, their paychecks, and the well-being of their families.
So, when coaches use social media, they are on the lookout for prospects making poor decisions, engaging in questionable behavior (especially drinking or using drugs) and using foul language. And they’re also getting a lot sneakier in how they do it, as some teams are using “fake accounts with cute girls” to monitor athletes. In fact, some athletic departments are doubling down, monitoring athletes and creating detailed reports about their activity. See for yourself:

We have a team of people who monitor what recruits are putting on social media. Watch what you tweet and retweet. pic.twitter.com/MNjrwSbuEd
— K-State Coach Van B Malone (@VanBMalone3rd) September 16, 2015
Fans are piling on the pressure
For standout recruits, interacting on social media can result in a lot more scrutiny. On one hand, Twitter and Instagram can help athletes get seen by coaches during their recruiting process. On the other hand, there are many fans online that want recruits to play for their favorite college and can be quite critical of student-athletes if they make the decision to attend somewhere else. Speaking to ESPN, four-star QB prospect Nick Starkel said, “Fans hop onto social media and take shots at high school kids who are being asked to make the biggest decision of their lives so far. Some fans don’t realize that we’re just kids making a huge decision.” And all that online attention does end up influencing recruits. ESPN added that of the top 80 high school football recruits, “23 percent said fans on social media influenced their recruiting process.”
Fake accounts are becoming more common
One way for student-athletes to avoid online scrutiny while still using social media is to set up fake accounts. This offers some privacy for student-athletes while still offering the opportunity to have fun with social media. However, standout recruits that don’t set up social media accounts for themselves are also at risk of being imitated with fake accounts. Former standout college players Marcus Mariota and Royce Freeman have both been subjects of fake social media accounts, for example. So, it’s also important to keep an eye out for these to ensure your reputation stays intact.
Recruiting through social media isn’t going away anytime soon. In fact, it will probably become even more common. That’s why it’s important to keep up with new rules and regulations, and to always present a respectable image online.

NCSA: What are the eight Athlete Types?

USA TODAY High School Sports has a weekly column on the college recruiting process. Here, you’ll find practical tips and real-world advice on becoming a better recruit to maximize your opportunities and play at the college level. Kyle Winters was a standout high school pitcher who tossed seven scoreless innings in a major tournament during his senior year. That performance against some heavy-hitting future MLB draft picks helped Kyle earn a full-ride scholarship to the University of New Mexico. However, Kyle opted to play professional baseball and was drafted by the Florida Marlins in the fifth round and played seven seasons for various minor league teams. Kyle is just one of many former college and professional players, college coaches and parents who are part of the Next College Student Athlete team. Their knowledge, experience and dedication, along with NCSA’s history of digital innovation and long-standing relationship with the college coaching community, have made NCSA the largest and most successful athletic recruiting network in the country.

How would you describe your athletic mindset? Do you take risks or play it safe? Do you wear your heart on your sleeve or keep your emotions in check? How do you respond to setbacks? Take the TAP test to find out your Athlete Type.
The Troutwine Athletic Profile (TAP) assessment was developed in the 1980s by professional sports psychologist Dr. Robert Troutwine as a way to evaluate the mental makeup of elite athletes and combat soldiers. The TAP test classifies athletes into eight distinct mindsets — each with their own characteristics, strengths, weaknesses and tips on maximizing potential for athletes, parents and coaches. Today, the TAP test is used by over 5,000 US high schools, 2,200 colleges and a number of pro teams like the San Antonio Spurs and the New England Patriots. In addition, 73,657 student-athletes in the NCSA network have taken the TAP test and posted verified results on their profiles.
During the recruiting process, intangibles can easily get overlooked. It’s easy for college coaches to evaluate athletes based on speed, strength, height, weight, stats and academics. But these tangible things are just the tip of the iceberg. Below the surface, things like coachability, mental toughness and competitive desire can help coaches identify athletes who are likely to thrive in their program. Here are the eight Athlete Types and what they mean.
Trailblazer: Spirited Athlete Type
The Trailblazer is full of energy and empathy. They are great at creative problem solving and adapting in the moment. They have a tremendous amount of passion for their sport and love the thrill of competition. However, Trailblazers can be prone to distraction, complicating simple tasks and setting unrealistic goals. At NCSA, 7.2 percent of our student-athletes are Trailblazers. On a pro sports level, Cam Newton, Tim Tebow and Zack Greinke are Trailblazers.
Rocket: Driven Athlete Type
Are you cool, calm and collected under pressure? The Rocket might just be your Athlete Type. The Rocket is decisive, works hard to accomplish their goals and displays a killer instinct in high pressure situations. However, they can be prone to overconfidence and making decisions prematurely. While just 5.4 percent of NCSA student-athletes are Rockets, a high percentage of NFL quarterbacks are classified under this Athlete Type. This includes Tom Brady, Andrew Luck and Carson Wentz.
Eagle: Responsible Athlete Type
The Eagle has a great attitude and sets a good example for teammates to emulate. They show up to practice on time, follow team rules and pay close attention to detail. While the Trailblazer is driven by a love for the game, the Eagle is motivated by trophies and awards. However, the Eagle can be prone to overlooking their flaws and settling for mediocrity. They can also harshly judge teammates who don’t reach their lofty standard. At NCSA, 12.8 percent of our student-athletes are Eagles. On the pro level, Russell Wilson, J.J. Watt and Mike Trout are Eagles.
Engineer: Independent Athlete Type
Do you have a tendency to prepare for the worst? The Engineer is extremely careful to avoid mistakes. They tend to be cerebral and stay on their toes during competition, but their aversion to risk can lead to overcompensating and missed opportunities. In addition, the Engineer needs plenty of praise and support to keep their confidence level high. 20.4 percent of NCSA student-athletes are Engineers. In the pros, Aaron Rodgers, Dirk Nowitzki and Cole Hamels are Engineers.
Knight: Protective Athlete Type
Knights listen before they speak and make decisions according to a strong internal belief system. They are very respectful of rules and prioritize time spent with close family and friends. However, Knights can be closed off and it can take time for coaches to earn their trust. They tend to clam up when upset and avoid conflict whenever possible. At NCSA, 21.3 percent of our student-athletes are Knights, the highest percentage of all the Athlete Types. In the pros, Kirk Cousins, Giancarlo Stanton and Manny Machado are Knights.
Musketeer: Helpful Athlete Type
“All for one and one for all.” The Musketeer has a strong desire to help others. They own up to their mistakes and are always willing to lend a helping hand. They also try not to jump to conclusions and are tolerant and open-minded. However, Musketeers have a tendency to focus more on the team than on winning and can be hesitant and low on confidence. At NCSA, 13.8 percent of our student-athletes are Musketeers. In the pros, Von Miller, Clay Matthews and Andrew McCutchen are Musketeers.
Ice: Methodical Athlete Type
Ice athletes are never satisfied and always looking to improve. They are self-critical and goal driven. They set long-term goals and work hard during the offseason to sharpen their skills and shore up their weaknesses. However, Ice athletes can be prone to putting too much pressure on themselves and dwelling on mistakes. They tend to see the glass as half-empty. At NCSA, Ice athletes comprise 7.5 percent of our recruits. In the pros, Rob Gronkowski, Aaron Judge and Chris Sale are Ice athletes.
Maverick: Dynamic Athlete Type
The Maverick is innovative, adaptive and rebellious. They are willing to take risks and comfortable adapting in the moment. The Maverick is reluctant to conform and comply to a rigid routine — they prefer to live in the moment and come up with new solutions on the fly. However, the Maverick is also prone to sloppiness and winging it.
While this Athlete Type might not be ideal for coaches with lots of rules and structure, a high percentage of star pitchers tend to be Mavericks. This includes Clayton Kershaw, Stephen Strasburg, Justin Verlander and Jake Arrieta. The Maverick’s creativity and ability to adapt can make them hard for batters to predict. At NCSA, 11.7 percent of our student-athletes are Mavericks.
Which Athlete Type is the best?
It depends. Each Athlete Type features a unique set of pros and cons that hinge on your sport and position. The Rocket’s poise under pressure can help them lead a fourth quarter touchdown drive. The Maverick’s willingness to tinker can help them fool batters and pitch out of jams. The Musketeer’s team-first mentality can help promote a tight-knit team culture. A strength in one situation can be a weakness in another. Take the TAP test to learn your Athlete Type.

NCSA: What is a full-ride scholarship?

USA TODAY High School Sports has a weekly column on the college recruiting process. Here, you’ll find practical tips and real-world advice on becoming a better recruit to maximize your opportunities to play at the college level. Nelson Gord is a former collegiate and professional ballplayer, successful high school head coach and also the founder of the largest travel baseball club in Illinois. Nelson is just one of many former college and professional players, college coaches and parents who are part of the Next College Student Athlete team. Their knowledge, experience and dedication, along with NCSA’s history of digital innovation and long-standing relationship with the college coaching community, helped create NCSA Team Edition, the free recruiting platform for club and high school coaches.

Let’s get real for a minute. Getting recruited to play sports in college is a tremendous opportunity. Playing college sports looks great on a resume and can be very rewarding. But at the end of the day, the number one reason why many parents and athletes want to play college sports is because they want a shot at scholarship money. College tuition continues to skyrocket and a scholarship can potentially save a family tens of thousands of dollars. That’s a pretty big incentive to go after an athletic scholarship!
However, there are some differences between different types of scholarships, as well as fine print for those that are awarded. Any student-athlete looking to score a scholarship should read on to find out the difference between those that are available.
Athletic full-ride scholarships
While a full-tuition scholarship may offer to pay for the entirety of a student’s tuition, attending college requires more than just paying for classes. There are various other fees, as well as the cost of books and room and board. That’s why a full-ride scholarship does its best to cover all the basic costs of attending college, including said books and living expenses. (Sometimes this can even mean including an iPad that is used in class.) But while “full-ride scholarship” may be a term that a lot of people are familiar with and gets tossed around on TV and in movies, it is actually just limited to just six “headcount” sports:

Football
Men’s basketball
Women’s basketball
Women’s gymnastics
Tennis
Volleyball

In headcount sports, scholarships are given out in all-or-nothing chunks. As a result, only about 1% of college student-athletes receive a full-ride scholarship. The remaining players on the roster are walk-ons, and some are preferred walk-ons that may have a chance at getting scholarship money down the line.
MORE: Everything You Need to Know About Scholarships
Partial scholarships
All other sports where scholarships are given out are known as “equivalency sports,” where the majority of scholarships are given as partial scholarships. Basically, the coach can decide how to break up his or her scholarships among the roster. Each program is different in how they divide their scholarship money up, and while you can find full-ride opportunities in equivalency sports, it is most common that athletes receive partial scholarships.
MORE: What are the Different Types of Scholarship Offers?
Not guaranteed
Another thing to know about athletic scholarships, including full rides, is that they are often (but not always) one-year agreements that need to be renewed each year. In 2015, NCAA Division 1 “Power 5” schools implemented a rule that essentially protected D1 student-athletes from having their athletic scholarship taken away for an athletics-related reason. So, if an athlete is not performing up to the coach’s expectations, they’re not at risk of losing their scholarship. However, this rule only applies to D1 schools in the Power 5 conferences: the Big Ten, Big 12, PAC-12, ACC, SEC and Notre Dame. This rule also applies only to athletes who signed their National Letter of Intent and scholarship agreement after January 2015 and who will be receiving an athletic scholarship in their first year.
Other Division 1 schools may choose to follow this rule but are not required to. At these schools, a coach can choose to not renew a scholarship for performance reasons. Finally, it’s still possible for schools to cancel or not renew athletic scholarships for non-athletic reasons, such as being ruled ineligible for competition, providing fraudulent information on paperwork (college application, letter of intent, or financial aid agreement), engaging in misconduct, voluntarily quitting a team or violating university policies. That’s why it’s important for student-athletes to stay on top of their NCAA eligibility requirements and also pick a school that they’d like to attend even if they were not playing sports there. After all, it’s difficult to predict the next four years of your athletic career.
MORE: How to Negotiate Your Athletic Scholarship Offer
Obtaining a full-ride athletic scholarship is a dream come true for many student-athletes, but it’s also a very difficult goal to achieve. That’s why it’s important to also be educated on the different types of scholarship offers and to have a backup plan in case things don’t work out as expected.

NCSA: 5 steps to a better highlight video

USA TODAY High School Sports has a weekly column on the college recruiting process. Here, you’ll find practical tips and real-world advice on becoming a better recruit to maximize your opportunities to play at the college level. Joe Leccesi is a former college athlete and coach at the NAIA level, where he earned an NAIA National Championship. Joe is just one of many former college and professional players, college coaches, and parents who are part of the Next College Student Athlete team. Their knowledge, experience, and dedication along with NCSA’s history of digital innovation, and long-standing relationship with the college coaching community have made NCSA the largest and most successful athletic recruiting network in the country.
NCSA
With winter break just a couple weeks away, the holiday season is a great time to work on your student-athlete’s highlight video. Whether you need to create your first video or update the current one, a well-crafted highlight video can be a highly effective recruiting tool. According to NCSA research, student-athletes with a video on their online profile are 12 times more likely to get viewed by coaches. Plus, throwing together a new video gives your child a great reason to email coaches and continue the campaign to get on their radar.
Read more: The important role of highlight and skills videos in recruiting
Before you start, keep in mind that different sports require different types of videos. In-game highlights are essential for recruiting in sports like football, volleyball and soccer. Baseball and softball coaches, however, want to see footage that focuses on technical skills and drills. No matter your sport, we recommend that recruits update their videos every six months. To make sure your video shows off the best of your student-athlete, follow these five important steps.
Take advantage of technology
In the world of sports video technology, Hudl is leading the way. In fact, most serious high school student-athletes include a Hudl link in their Twitter bio. Hudl Focus, the software company’s latest product, is a smart camera that switches on automatically, tracks the play from multiple angles and uploads the video directly to Hudl. Before you go out and buy equipment, check to see if your school or club team is using Hudl Focus or another method to film games and practices. After talking with the coach, if you feel the school or club doesn’t have adequate or reliable video resources, it might be time for you to take on filming duties.
Keep it short and simple
How often do you click on an article and close it after skimming the first couple paragraphs?
Coaches try to watch as many highlight videos as they can, but they sometimes only make it through the first 20 or 30 seconds. To stand out right away, include your athletic and academic info including your jersey number in the first few seconds of the video. Then, jump right in to your best highlights. While video editing should be simple and straightforward, it can be helpful in some cases to add an arrow or another indicator to help coaches keep track of your student-athlete.
Your entire video should be no more than 3-5 minutes long. And since most coaches watch highlight videos on mute, there’s no need to add dramatic music or special effects. Never lose sight of the goal. You’re not entering a film festival—the purpose of your video is to grab the attention of a college coach.
Plan video shoots to perfection
College coaches don’t expect your video to be SportsCenter quality. But shaky, blurry or grainy footage isn’t doing you any favors. Get to the game early to stake out your spot. Try to get as close as you can and find a place with a clear view of the action. Whether you’re filming with a smartphone or a video camera, invest in a tripod to minimize shaky or blurry footage. Resist the urge to zoom in and out—this can be just as distracting as a shaky camera. And if weather conditions are unfavorable or your opponent’s gym is dark and cavernous, you might be better off packing up your video equipment and just watching the game.
Stockpile as much footage as possible
You can never have too much video. The more games and skill sessions you record, the better your chance of capturing highlight-reel plays to include in your student-athlete’s video. Even losses and poor performances can include a few diamonds in the rough. As you film games and start to pare down clips, always include footage from before and after the play. College coaches don’t just want to see your child drain a three-pointer–they also want to see your child’s off-ball movement to get open and how quickly they hustle back on defense after making the shot.
Reach out to parents and professionals
You don’t have to do all the filming and editing yourself. Never be afraid to ask teammates’ families for footage or video advice. Even if you record footage at every game, another parent might capture your child’s big play from a better angle. And if you can’t make it to a game, plan ahead to make sure someone is in charge of video.
Once you’ve got plenty of good footage, you’re ready for the all-important (and time-consuming) editing process. While coaches generally prefer simple, no-frills editing, a professional videographer can quickly turn disorganized raw footage into a cohesive sequence of highlights. As part of our recruiting service for student-athletes, NCSA’s full-service video editing team offers professionally edited video highlights.

NCSA: How to respond to, and negotiate multiple scholarship offers

USA TODAY High School Sports has a weekly column on the college recruiting process. Here, you’ll find practical tips and real-world advice on becoming a better recruit to maximize your opportunities to play at the college level. Nelson Gord is a former collegiate and professional ballplayer, successful high school head coach, and also the founder of the largest travel baseball club in Illinois. Nelson is just one of many former college and professional players, college coaches and parents who are part of the Next College Student Athlete team. Their knowledge, experience and dedication, along with NCSA’s history of digital innovation and long-standing relationship with the college coaching community, helped create NCSA Team Edition, the free recruiting platform for club and high school coaches.

Receiving an athletic scholarship offer is no small feat—for the vast majority of student-athletes it’s a culmination of years spent working in the gym and hitting the books in the classroom. But sometimes student-athletes are fortunate enough to not only receive one or two athletic scholarship offers, but several. And this can also happen seemingly at once for some recruits, causing a lot of stress related to making a life-changing decision. That’s why coaches and parents need to be supportive and student-athletes need to take some steps in order to make the right decision. What are they? Keep reading to find out.
Don’t rush the decision
As I’ve mentioned before, picking a college can be a life-changing decision—it won’t just affect the student-athlete for the next four years, but in some cases, their entire professional career. It’s true that coaches often prefer to get as many of their target recruits committed early so that they can move on to running their program, but recruits need to resist the pressure and avoid making a hasty decision before they’re ready. It’s perfectly acceptable to tell a coach you need some time to think it over and ask them when they need your response. The coach may give you a week or two, and you should use that time to reach out to your other schools.
Use the best leverage you’ve got
The best leverage you have when negotiating your athletic scholarship offer is legitimate offers from other schools. This is why it’s so important to have a large group of schools you’re interested in and continue conversations with coaches at your top schools, rather than narrowing it down to just one school at the beginning of the process. Note that schools are more likely to up their offer if they are competing for a recruit against a rival school. College rivalries run deep, and this can help your recruiting efforts as long as you have legitimate interest from both schools.
READ MORE: The top three drivers for a coach to increase a scholarship offer
Don’t stop your search
Have you visited every school that you’re considering attending? Are you even sure you want to attend a school if you haven’t visited it? Visits are very important—not only get to know the school and campus, but also to get to know the coaches and program. It also helps to talk to the current team members about their experience and determining whether it’s a positive team environment. Finally, having options is great, but it doesn’t mean that you have to limit your decision to those options. If you have several options on the table to fall back on, this is a perfect time to see if you can generate interest from your “dream school” and see if you have a chance at a roster spot–just be smart about it. You never want to call a coach saying “Hey, I just got an offer from School X, are you interested in me?” A better move would be to promote your offer on social media or recruiting media sites like rivals.com or 247 Sports.
READ MORE: Negotiating your scholarship offers
Discuss the decision with someone you trust
Picking a college can be nerve-racking, especially for a teenager. It’s almost unfair to put this kind of pressure on young people, but nevertheless, this is how the system works. That’s why it’s important to talk to a trusted family member or coach about picking the right school and what you want in a collegiate experience. There’s a good chance you’ll get some smart advice, and even if you don’t, it’s helpful to talk through the process. Some things to consider: the geographic location of the school; your academic interests; social life at the college; and your ability to succeed at the school’s division level.
Learn what a verbal commitment means
A verbal commitment may sound like a done deal, but in reality, it’s not actually binding. Many recruits get confused about what verbal offers and commitments really mean, and it’s important to remember that verbal offers are more like agreements between the athlete and coach, and either party can withdraw at any time. A verbal offer is made official once you sign the National Letter of Intent and financial aid papers have been drawn up. So, a verbal offer basically means you’re very close to getting a roster spot but haven’t crossed the finish line just yet.
In the highly competitive world of college sports an athletic scholarship is a significant achievement, but one that comes with a responsibility and will require more research in order for a student-athlete to make the right decision.

NCSA: 25 Twitter accounts to follow for college recruiting

USA TODAY High School Sports has a weekly column on the college recruiting process. Here, you’ll find practical tips and real-world advice on becoming a better recruit to maximize your opportunities to play at the college level. Nelson Gord is a former collegiate and professional ballplayer, successful high school head coach, and also the founder of the largest travel baseball club in Illinois. Nelson is just one of many former college and professional players, college coaches, and parents who are part of the Next College Student Athlete team. Their knowledge, experience, and dedication, along with NCSA’s history of digital innovation and long-standing relationship with the college coaching community, helped create NCSA Team Edition, the free recruiting platform for club and high school coaches.

Whether it’s dishing on the college recruiting process, offering tips on improving one’s game or simply covering the goings on of college and high school sports, there are plenty of Twitter accounts out there that can be a helpful resource for high school athletes looking to compete in college.

RelatedNCSA Power Rankings: The Best Schools for Student-AthletesNCSA: Nine overlooked questions for college coaches you shouldn’t forgetNCSA: My successful walk-on journey to a D1 program
Why Twitter? For most college coaches, Twitter still remains their preferred social media platform. Of course, NCSA has always been an excellent source of information on the college recruiting process, but we’ve also compiled this handy list of Twitter accounts to help you on your college recruiting journey. Follow and learn.
NCAA Research (@NCAAResearch)
Offering tons of helpful stats and data that comes from national research, NCAA Research is follow-worthy and worth checking on regularly.

States with the highest percentage of their HS boys wrestlers recruited by an NCAA Division I school:
1. Virginia2. Pennsylvania3. New Jersey4. Ohio5. Maryland6-10. OK, NY, MI, SD, IA#NCAAWrestling[Data updated Aug 2018] pic.twitter.com/aOVC1INadp
— NCAA Research (@NCAAResearch) November 2, 2018

Derek Jones (@dukecoachdj)
As the associate head coach and defensive back coach for Duke University football, Derek Jones has plenty of motivational quotes and sage advice to offer.

No matter how competitive things get in a contest it’s never ok to not demonstrate good sportsmanship. Passion, excitement or Intensity should never change who you are. #Ap2w
— Derek Jones (@dukecoachdj) November 12, 2018

Larissa Anderson (@CoachLarissaA)
As head coach of Mizzou softball, coach Anderson knows a thing or two about preparing for success.

I'd take a 2-star recruit with a 5-star work ethic over a 5-star recruit with a 2-star work ethic any day. #OwnIt
— Larissa Anderson (@CoachLarissaA) November 2, 2018

Daniel Nicolaisen (@CoachDanielnn)
Nicolaisen is a real numbers guy who also gets into the nitty gritty of softball mechanics.

The 3 new metrics from the recent Blast update that Im absolute fascinated by is
Rotational AccelerationEarly ConnectionConnection at Impact
Without good sequencing your rotational acceleration will be low and your commit time will be early
It’s worth sacrificing BS for this pic.twitter.com/jCZmbLQj2H
— Daniel Nicolaisen (@Coach_Danielnn) November 13, 2018

Dan Tudor (@dantudor)
Dan works with colleges around the country to help them recruit more effectively. His Twitter feed offers insight into how coaches are thinking about recruits during the recruiting process.

The Importance of Passion vs. Pressure in recruiting…we explain it in today's College Recruiting Weekly newsletter! Read it here, Coach: https://t.co/XI8XBRnOoC pic.twitter.com/H4wQwigbwN
— Dan Tudor (@dantudor) November 13, 2018

James Leath (@jamesleath)
James works as a performance coach for athletes and performers and shares lots of motivational quotes that can help young athletes stay motivated.

“The hardest skill to acquire in this sport is the one where you compete all out, give it all you have, and you are still getting beat no matter what you do. When you have the killer instinct to fight through that, it is very special.”– Eddie Reese
— James Leath (@jamesleath) August 24, 2018

YLMSportScience (@YLMSportScience)
Run by Yann Le Meur, this Twitter account shows off his insight into sport science and offers helpful advice on boosting performance.

This recent research reported that a shower before bedtime may improve the sleep onset latency. Easy tip for recovery https://t.co/4AlIsfYuul
— YLMSportScience (@YLMSportScience) November 15, 2018

NCAA Wrestling (@ncaawrestling)
The go-to source for updates and related info on college wrestling.

Single-year Academic Progress Rate has increased in the last six years among DI #NCAAwrestling teams: https://t.co/FStD3WYvLY pic.twitter.com/dIlfYGK5SL
— NCAA Wrestling (@ncaawrestling) May 24, 2018

Brian Williams (@BrianWWilliams)
Brian’s basketball-focused Twitter page is full of helpful drills, info, and videos that can help athletes understand plays and basketball concepts.

Icing a Side Pick and Roll #ResourcesCoaching18 https://t.co/BtDkmguOHS
— Brian Williams (@BrianWWilliams) November 15, 2018

Matt Lisle (@CoachLisle)
As the University of Missouri baseball hitting coach, Matt Lisle not only offers hitting analysis but also some pretty wise words.

HS/College Athletes: When you're 25 you're going to realize that the people who demanded your best were also the ones who cared about you the most
— Matt Lisle (@CoachLisle) October 31, 2018

Rowing Related (@RowingRelated)
It can be difficult to find timely, insightful news about rowing. Rowing Related does a great job covering the sport and should be required reading for every hopeful college rower.

Live now: The first installment of a new series with @PBC_potomacstar on the American club rowing experience—'A Modern Club Rower's Manifesto' https://t.co/qJ9Jkijm23 #rowingrelated pic.twitter.com/dxEkYXL1H3
— RowingRelated (@rowingrelated) April 25, 2018

Brandon Elliott (@ElliottSaysWhat)
Brandon Elliott serves as head coach of the national champion Virginia Wesleyan University softball program and regularly offers some very useful advice.

Outfielders: Catch the ball with one hand and on your glove side. Stop blocking your vision by catching on your arm side and worrying about being in a good position to throw. Your feet get you in a position to throw. Plus, one hand looks cooler.
— Brandon Elliott (@ElliottSaysWhat) November 14, 2018

Bret McCormick (@ASGR1995)
A Division 1 women’s basketball assistant coach and a voter for the annual POY Naismith Trophy, coach McCormick shares plenty of information on women’s college basketball recruiting.

The 2019 Naismith High School Girl’s Basketball Watch List has been released.https://t.co/TnebNs6gvn watch list players are ranked on the App at https://t.co/Mfxl8m12zX
— Bret McCormick (@ASGR1995) November 13, 2018

USCHO (@USCHO)
Covering both men’s and women’s hockey, USHCO is a great account for those who want to check in on the college hockey world.

With 13 first-place votes, @ECWomensHockey remains No. 1 in the #USCHO Division III Women’s Poll this week.
No. 2 @CardinalsWHKY earns the other two first-place votes. pic.twitter.com/zvyqfILXJw
— USCHO.com (@USCHO) November 12, 2018

TopDrawerSoccer (@TopDrawerSoccer)
Billing itself as the number 1 spot for college, youth, national team, club and high school soccer, Top Drawer provides insight on the college soccer scene.

Keep up with all of the latest commitments for each level of college soccer. https://t.co/NkGGMty22w
— TopDrawerSoccer (@TopDrawerSoccer) November 15, 2018

MaxPreps (@MaxPreps)
When it comes to coverage of high school sports, MaxPreps has you covered.

These are your 2018-19 Preseason Top 100 High School Basketball Teams
• California leads the way with 9 total teams• LaMelo Ball's @SPIRE_Institute cracks top 50• California: 9, Texas: 8, Georgia: 7https://t.co/d9OJMQA7vO pic.twitter.com/xlADCLtEMa
— MaxPreps (@MaxPreps) November 8, 2018

Rivals (@Rivals)
Another trusted name in high school sports coverage, Rivals focuses on football and basketball.

5-Star Check-up: South @ChadSimmons_ checks in on 2019 5-stars & has updates for each on "open," "looking" or "locked." Full Feature: https://t.co/Eg0finAdLt pic.twitter.com/EbsmeXNX7E
— Rivals (@Rivals) November 15, 2018

Inside Lacrosse (@Inside_Lacrosse)
Covering college and professional lacrosse, Inside Lacrosse offers news on the sport and also publishes 11 issues per year.

18 top Division I coaches made up the staff at Saturday's @IglooLacrosse LI Elite 80, a mix of instructional work & games. Here's a look at some of the underclassmen that stood out (via @tyxanders): https://t.co/dvx8ILbNwl pic.twitter.com/b0fDQQCNRN
— Inside Lacrosse (@Inside_Lacrosse) November 8, 2018

Gators Track & Field and Cross Country (@GatorsTF)
Want a behind-the-scenes look at one of the top track & field and cross country programs in the country? The University of Florida squad’s Twitter has you covered.

"Today’s objective was to race hard and see how we responded to adversity when faced with it. Both the men and the women came off the summer quite well and now we go back to work.” –@ChrisSolinsky #TougherTogether #GoGators https://t.co/EvoRWxTW6J
— Gators Track and Field & Cross Country (@GatorsTF) September 8, 2018

AVCA (@AVCAVolleyball)
You can be sure that the American Volleyball Coaches Association knows a thing or two about volleyball.

#NationalSigningDay is about way more than the location of your next volleyball season. It's where you'll be taking the next step into adulthood. making friends and memories you'll carry for the rest of your lives.
— AVCA (@AVCAVolleyball) November 14, 2018

Five-Star Basketball (@5starbasketball)
Five-Star Basketball has been hosting high-intensity basketball camps for boys and girls since 1966, and their Twitter feed offers plenty of game tips and inspirations.

Buddy Hield tries to get between 300-500 shots a day outside of practice. When he feels off, he'll push himself into the 500-700 range. pic.twitter.com/yITJyH7FbD
— Five-Star Basketball (@5starbasketball) May 3, 2018

Front Rush (@FrontRush)
Front Rush help coaches recruit smarter through data, but a lot of their advice carries over to athletes as well.

Spread the word, coaches
11 Things College Volleyball Coaches Look for From Recruits https://t.co/pb1NkCMQPQ
— Front Rush (@FrontRush) November 1, 2018

IMG Academy (@IMGAcademy)
The IMG Academy feed offers a closer look at some of the best high school athletes in the country.

Some @IMGATennis players got the chance to try out the Mind Gym today in our Performance Center – hope some make it back for our Tuesday and Thursday 6 pm open times! @DynavisionIntl @Fitlight pic.twitter.com/EtPRn7EXvA
— IMGA Performance (@IMGAPerformance) September 14, 2018

Prep Hoops (@PrepHoops)
If you’re a hooper, Prep Hoops is a good account to follow for news on the basketball recruiting circuit.

4 F’s that defeat people:
1. Fear2. Frustration3. Fatigue4. Failure
How you deal with and overcomethese 4 F’s ultimately determinesyour success in sport and life.
(h/t @janssenleader)
— Prep Hoops (@PrepHoops) October 29, 2018

NCSA (@NCSA)
Oh, think we’re too humble to resort to some shameless self-promotion? Think again. From the annual NCSA Power Rankings—which rank the best colleges for student-athletes—to in-depth articles about the athletic recruiting process, our Twitter feed is overflowing with helpful recruiting information.

See the complete 2018 #NCSAPowerRankings Best Schools in the U.S. for Student-Athletes by visiting here: https://t.co/WQRsba1vJv pic.twitter.com/OL3DDhvb2n
— Athletic Recruiting (@ncsa) November 13, 2018